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Re-Arranging My DNA

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Martha Beck is a genius. Well – I realized that is stating the obvious, but I have a point to make. You see, five years ago I was lucky enough to be personally trained by her in the skills of Life Coaching.Β  At the time, you didn’t meet a life coach every two feet – in fact I didn’t even know what it was when she offered it to me.

But I digress.

Martha taught and trained me using one of my favorite tools – metaphors. She and I are both natural story tellers, so metaphors come easily and naturally.Β  As you can probably tell if you’ve read anything I’ve written here. πŸ™‚

As I am working on this journey to Escape Mediocrity, many of her metaphors roll around in my head. And yesterday I remembered one in particular that seems quite fitting as I finish up my time Walking The Grid and consider moving out into The Great Big World.

Goo

cocoonI clearly missed some important points in science class. Somehow, I thought that when a caterpillar climbed up into its cocoon, it just sort of shrank, sprouted antennae and grew some wings before emerging as a butterfly.

Nope.

Caterpillars spin their cocoon, climb into it and seal it. Then they COMPLETELY BREAK DOWN THEIR DNA. That’s right – they disintegrate into goo. In fact if you break open a cocoon mid-way through the metamorphosis cycle, that is all you will find inside – goo.

So, they break down their DNA as a caterpillar and then re-arrange it into the DNA of a butterfly. HOW exactly that happens is simply beyond my comprehension. But this is the part I like to remember: to become a butterfly, the caterpillar has to be Goo first.

I think the same kind of thing happens when we start to escape mediocrity. We have to go through the Goo Phase so that we can re-arrange our DNA into that of whatever it is we are becoming.

This metaphor makes me happy because it applies anyone who is trying to break out and become something more. It applies to budding entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs who want to shake up the way they do things, individuals who feel pulled to a bigger game in life, anyone really who is taking BIG risks to be more of who they are in this world.

Notes From The Field

Having been in the Goo Phase more than once, here are some things I can tell you about it:

1) To Escape Mediocrity and become something and someone more, you (and probably your business) are going to butterflyhave to re-arrange your DNA. I don’t know any other way to do that other than passing through the Goo phase.

2) You can’t rush it. Rearranging DNA takes however long it takes.

3) It does not feel very good. Face it, being goo feels like, well, being goo. Stop fighting it.

4) Don’t let anyone crack you open mid-metamorphosis. a) all they will see is goo and b) you’ll probably have to start all over again. Neither of these are very encouraging.

5) It helps IMMENSELY to have people around you who are either going through it or have been through it to encourage you when you just can’t take being Goo one more day.

I’m betting some of you have been through the Goo Phase a time or two as well. What are some notes you have on getting though it and emerging from your cocoon as a butterfly?

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  • Sarah….”To Escape Mediocrity and become something more, you are going to have to re-arrange your DNA”…this is so, so true and you know what it is scientifically proven that human beings can change their DNA…..in fact one of the pioneers of understanding DNA. Bruce Lipton wrote a book on it called The Biology of Belief….in this easy to comprehend, for us non-scholar types..Lipton writes that “life is not controlled by genes”…and that's excatly what your post indicates and here's what Wayne Dter says about it in his new book Excuses Begone “Your perceptions have the power to change your genetic makeup – your beliefs can and do control your biology.” I love your metaphor Sarah, it may sound radical but what you write is an awareness that will change misleading beliefs.Well said…Colin

  • Sarah….”To Escape Mediocrity and become something more, you are going to have to re-arrange your DNA”…this is so, so true and you know what it is scientifically proven that human beings can change their DNA…..in fact one of the pioneers of understanding DNA. Bruce Lipton wrote a book on it called The Biology of Belief….in this easy to comprehend, for us non-scholar types..Lipton writes that “life is not controlled by genes”…and that's excatly what your post indicates and here's what Wayne Dter says about it in his new book Excuses Begone “Your perceptions have the power to change your genetic makeup – your beliefs can and do control your biology.” I love your metaphor Sarah, it may sound radical but what you write is an awareness that will change misleading beliefs.

    Well said…Colin

  • Sarah….”To Escape Mediocrity and become something more, you are going to have to re-arrange your DNA”…this is so, so true and you know what it is scientifically proven that human beings can change their DNA…..in fact one of the pioneers of understanding DNA. Bruce Lipton wrote a book on it called The Biology of Belief….in this easy to comprehend, for us non-scholar types..Lipton writes that “life is not controlled by genes”…and that's excatly what your post indicates and here's what Wayne Dter says about it in his new book Excuses Begone “Your perceptions have the power to change your genetic makeup – your beliefs can and do control your biology.” I love your metaphor Sarah, it may sound radical but what you write is an awareness that will change misleading beliefs.

    Well said…Colin

  • What a perfect metaphor that also explains “chemicalization” in the Law of Attraction! I like to use the metaphor of a forest fire. It's unfortunate, ugly and disheartening. It kills many things, but in the end it is necessary to eliminate the dead debris holding you down and allow new, healthy growth to begin! I also love Martha Beck, she has such a wonderful way of conveying her message. Congratulations on your ability to view your own “goo” stage and move through it. I am cheering you on in your quest to “escape mediocrity!”

  • What a perfect metaphor that also explains “chemicalization” in the Law of Attraction! I like to use the metaphor of a forest fire. It's unfortunate, ugly and disheartening. It kills many things, but in the end it is necessary to eliminate the dead debris holding you down and allow new, healthy growth to begin!
    I also love Martha Beck, she has such a wonderful way of conveying her message. Congratulations on your ability to view your own “goo” stage and move through it. I am cheering you on in your quest to “escape mediocrity!”

  • What a perfect metaphor that also explains “chemicalization” in the Law of Attraction! I like to use the metaphor of a forest fire. It's unfortunate, ugly and disheartening. It kills many things, but in the end it is necessary to eliminate the dead debris holding you down and allow new, healthy growth to begin!
    I also love Martha Beck, she has such a wonderful way of conveying her message. Congratulations on your ability to view your own “goo” stage and move through it. I am cheering you on in your quest to “escape mediocrity!”

  • The more I think about zour metaphor the better it gets. You probably know the Greek word for butterfly means β€œsoul.” and like butterflies rise above what was once considered a limiting existence, when we burst out of our cocoon we strengthen our muscles of the soul…Love itColin

  • The more I think about zour metaphor the better it gets. You probably know the Greek word for butterfly means β€œsoul.” and like butterflies rise above what was once considered a limiting existence, when we burst out of our cocoon we strengthen our muscles of the soul…

    Love it

    Colin

  • The more I think about zour metaphor the better it gets. You probably know the Greek word for butterfly means β€œsoul.” and like butterflies rise above what was once considered a limiting existence, when we burst out of our cocoon we strengthen our muscles of the soul…

    Love it

    Colin

  • drmolliemarti

    Love Martha Beck…and love YOU!We've had some gooey caterpillar talks…and there's that old Caterpillar Soup book (that whole “in progress” thing…) on my computer. Sarah, you “get” goo like no other coach I've known, and I'm so thankful to have you in my life for goo stages…and to celebrate the birthing of the beautiful butterfly that emerges. Surrounding yourself with others who honor you and the space you need to let the process unfold is essential. Having a coach who can see the beauty of the emerging butterfly and lend you this vision to help you get through the muckiest of the goo phase also helps immensely.Keep designing your wings, dear, because you are going to SOAR!!!!Mollie

  • drmolliemarti

    Love Martha Beck…and love YOU!

    We've had some gooey caterpillar talks…and there's that old Caterpillar Soup book (that whole “in progress” thing…) on my computer.

    Sarah, you “get” goo like no other coach I've known, and I'm so thankful to have you in my life for goo stages…and to celebrate the birthing of the beautiful butterfly that emerges.

    Surrounding yourself with others who honor you and the space you need to let the process unfold is essential. Having a coach who can see the beauty of the emerging butterfly and lend you this vision to help you get through the muckiest of the goo phase also helps immensely.

    Keep designing your wings, dear, because you are going to SOAR!!!!

    Mollie

  • Love Martha Beck…and love YOU!

    We've had some gooey caterpillar talks…and there's that old Caterpillar Soup book (that whole “in progress” thing…) on my computer.

    Sarah, you “get” goo like no other coach I've known, and I'm so thankful to have you in my life for goo stages…and to celebrate the birthing of the beautiful butterfly that emerges.

    Surrounding yourself with others who honor you and the space you need to let the process unfold is essential. Having a coach who can see the beauty of the emerging butterfly and lend you this vision to help you get through the muckiest of the goo phase also helps immensely.

    Keep designing your wings, dear, because you are going to SOAR!!!!

    Mollie

  • Sarah….”To Escape Mediocrity and become something more, you are going to have to re-arrange your DNA”…this is so, so true and you know what it is scientifically proven that human beings can change their DNA…..in fact one of the pioneers of understanding DNA. Bruce Lipton wrote a book on it called The Biology of Belief….in this easy to comprehend, for us non-scholar types..Lipton writes that “life is not controlled by genes”…and that’s excatly what your post indicates and here’s what Wayne Dter says about it in his new book Excuses Begone “Your perceptions have the power to change your genetic makeup – your beliefs can and do control your biology.” I love your metaphor Sarah, it may sound radical but what you write is an awareness that will change misleading beliefs.

    Well said…Colin

    • Anonymous

      Colin – your wisdom and eloquence do me credit – thank you. And just for the sake of everyone reading this comment, I happen to know you ARE the scholarly type! I love that you cite two sources that validate the theory that we can actually change our DNA by how we think. Excellent!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Colin – your wisdom and eloquence do me credit – thank you. And just for the sake of everyone reading this comment, I happen to know you ARE the scholarly type! I love that you cite two sources that validate the theory that we can actually change our DNA by how we think. Excellent!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Colin – your wisdom and eloquence do me credit – thank you. And just for the sake of everyone reading this comment, I happen to know you ARE the scholarly type! I love that you cite two sources that validate the theory that we can actually change our DNA by how we think. Excellent!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Colin – your wisdom and eloquence do me credit – thank you. And just for the sake of everyone reading this comment, I happen to know you ARE the scholarly type! I love that you cite two sources that validate the theory that we can actually change our DNA by how we think. Excellent!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Oh wow – I like your metaphor too. I think I'll have to “borrow” it!! Thanks for sharing it, your love for Martha – and most of all, your enthusiasm!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Oh wow – I like your metaphor too. I think I'll have to “borrow” it!! Thanks for sharing it, your love for Martha – and most of all, your enthusiasm!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Oh wow – I like your metaphor too. I think I'll have to “borrow” it!! Thanks for sharing it, your love for Martha – and most of all, your enthusiasm!!

  • What a perfect metaphor that also explains “chemicalization” in the Law of Attraction! I like to use the metaphor of a forest fire. It’s unfortunate, ugly and disheartening. It kills many things, but in the end it is necessary to eliminate the dead debris holding you down and allow new, healthy growth to begin!
    I also love Martha Beck, she has such a wonderful way of conveying her message. Congratulations on your ability to view your own “goo” stage and move through it. I am cheering you on in your quest to “escape mediocrity!”

    • Anonymous

      Oh wow – I like your metaphor too. I think I’ll have to “borrow” it!! Thanks for sharing it, your love for Martha – and most of all, your enthusiasm!!

  • sarahrobinson

    Well Mollie – you know the reason I understand it so well is because I spend so much time there!! Thank you for sharing your words of wisdom – I need them every day. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Well Mollie – you know the reason I understand it so well is because I spend so much time there!! Thank you for sharing your words of wisdom – I need them every day. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Well Mollie – you know the reason I understand it so well is because I spend so much time there!! Thank you for sharing your words of wisdom – I need them every day. πŸ™‚

  • The more I think about zour metaphor the better it gets. You probably know the Greek word for butterfly means β€œsoul.” and like butterflies rise above what was once considered a limiting existence, when we burst out of our cocoon we strengthen our muscles of the soul…

    Love it

    Colin

  • Love Martha Beck…and love YOU!

    We’ve had some gooey caterpillar talks…and there’s that old Caterpillar Soup book (that whole “in progress” thing…) on my computer.

    Sarah, you “get” goo like no other coach I’ve known, and I’m so thankful to have you in my life for goo stages…and to celebrate the birthing of the beautiful butterfly that emerges.

    Surrounding yourself with others who honor you and the space you need to let the process unfold is essential. Having a coach who can see the beauty of the emerging butterfly and lend you this vision to help you get through the muckiest of the goo phase also helps immensely.

    Keep designing your wings, dear, because you are going to SOAR!!!!

    Mollie

    • Anonymous

      Well Mollie – you know the reason I understand it so well is because I spend so much time there!! Thank you for sharing your words of wisdom – I need them every day. πŸ™‚

  • I think many of us are taught to look at our childhood as being the “goo” stage of our lifespan and as adults, we're expected to be the butterfly that emerges from the cocoon of childhood. We also tend to look at that cocoon as being a shelter from the realities of the world.Perhaps we should realize that we never really become the butterfly, especially if we're continuing to try and improve ourselves. And as for that cocoon, it's not a shelter from the world, but the support we need to help us while we work on improving ourselves. From that vantage point, being goo isn't so bad after all since it means we're working on improving ourselves, of moving ourselves one step closer to becoming a butterfly.

  • I think many of us are taught to look at our childhood as being the “goo” stage of our lifespan and as adults, we're expected to be the butterfly that emerges from the cocoon of childhood. We also tend to look at that cocoon as being a shelter from the realities of the world.

    Perhaps we should realize that we never really become the butterfly, especially if we're continuing to try and improve ourselves. And as for that cocoon, it's not a shelter from the world, but the support we need to help us while we work on improving ourselves. From that vantage point, being goo isn't so bad after all since it means we're working on improving ourselves, of moving ourselves one step closer to becoming a butterfly.

  • I think many of us are taught to look at our childhood as being the “goo” stage of our lifespan and as adults, we're expected to be the butterfly that emerges from the cocoon of childhood. We also tend to look at that cocoon as being a shelter from the realities of the world.

    Perhaps we should realize that we never really become the butterfly, especially if we're continuing to try and improve ourselves. And as for that cocoon, it's not a shelter from the world, but the support we need to help us while we work on improving ourselves. From that vantage point, being goo isn't so bad after all since it means we're working on improving ourselves, of moving ourselves one step closer to becoming a butterfly.

  • bethwarren

    That is an excellent metaphor! I believe I've been goo once or twice.. πŸ˜‰

  • bethwarren

    That is an excellent metaphor! I believe I've been goo once or twice.. πŸ˜‰

  • bethwarren

    That is an excellent metaphor! I believe I've been goo once or twice.. πŸ˜‰

  • Sarah, you always seem to frame your messages in such an accessible way – thank you for that. I love the caterpillar/butterfly image (I must admit, I didn't know about the goo stage, but it makes sense now that I stop to consider it). I also liked Kimberly's forest fire metaphor. It made me remember a speaker I saw in college. He visited from Siskiyou National Forest in Oregon. He said that going in and cleaning up after a forest fire (in natural lands, of course) is, “like mugging a burn victim.” That phrase always stayed with me, and in light of your post it resounds even more. People change at their own rate, and trying to make it “hurry up and happen already” would be like going in and cleaning up the leftover yet vital debris that the forest needs to grow back even stronger (or, as you say, like pulling open the cocoon before the butterfly is ready to fly). Patience, both in the one changing and in their supporters, makes all the difference. Thanks again for another great and thought-provoking post!

  • Sarah, you always seem to frame your messages in such an accessible way – thank you for that. I love the caterpillar/butterfly image (I must admit, I didn't know about the goo stage, but it makes sense now that I stop to consider it).

    I also liked Kimberly's forest fire metaphor. It made me remember a speaker I saw in college. He visited from Siskiyou National Forest in Oregon. He said that going in and cleaning up after a forest fire (in natural lands, of course) is, “like mugging a burn victim.” That phrase always stayed with me, and in light of your post it resounds even more.

    People change at their own rate, and trying to make it “hurry up and happen already” would be like going in and cleaning up the leftover yet vital debris that the forest needs to grow back even stronger (or, as you say, like pulling open the cocoon before the butterfly is ready to fly). Patience, both in the one changing and in their supporters, makes all the difference. Thanks again for another great and thought-provoking post!

  • Sarah, you always seem to frame your messages in such an accessible way – thank you for that. I love the caterpillar/butterfly image (I must admit, I didn't know about the goo stage, but it makes sense now that I stop to consider it).

    I also liked Kimberly's forest fire metaphor. It made me remember a speaker I saw in college. He visited from Siskiyou National Forest in Oregon. He said that going in and cleaning up after a forest fire (in natural lands, of course) is, “like mugging a burn victim.” That phrase always stayed with me, and in light of your post it resounds even more.

    People change at their own rate, and trying to make it “hurry up and happen already” would be like going in and cleaning up the leftover yet vital debris that the forest needs to grow back even stronger (or, as you say, like pulling open the cocoon before the butterfly is ready to fly). Patience, both in the one changing and in their supporters, makes all the difference. Thanks again for another great and thought-provoking post!

  • I think a real challenge, as you get older (I'm of course talking about other people, not me!), is that one increasingly rationalizes the idea that there no longer is a need for reinventing onesself, especially in the face of the fact that the DNA seems to be permanently wired. The truth in this is that the fear of re-arranging the DNA is so gargantuan that it becomes a virtual obstacle to us proactively participating in that reinvention. FDR said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself”, and that governs our reticence to accept that change is inevitable, so you either fear it and are a passenger or you act and become the driver. Thanks for the post, SR. As always, right on target.

  • I think a real challenge, as you get older (I'm of course talking about other people, not me!), is that one increasingly rationalizes the idea that there no longer is a need for reinventing onesself, especially in the face of the fact that the DNA seems to be permanently wired. The truth in this is that the fear of re-arranging the DNA is so gargantuan that it becomes a virtual obstacle to us proactively participating in that reinvention. FDR said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself”, and that governs our reticence to accept that change is inevitable, so you either fear it and are a passenger or you act and become the driver.

    Thanks for the post, SR. As always, right on target.

  • I think a real challenge, as you get older (I'm of course talking about other people, not me!), is that one increasingly rationalizes the idea that there no longer is a need for reinventing onesself, especially in the face of the fact that the DNA seems to be permanently wired. The truth in this is that the fear of re-arranging the DNA is so gargantuan that it becomes a virtual obstacle to us proactively participating in that reinvention. FDR said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself”, and that governs our reticence to accept that change is inevitable, so you either fear it and are a passenger or you act and become the driver.

    Thanks for the post, SR. As always, right on target.

  • sarahrobinson

    I think you are so right Tanveer. There is THE way we are “supposed” to do the cocoon thing. And like most other things, when we buy into these common ideas, we are opting for average and mediocre. I also love, love, love your description of the cocoon as support – just beautiful. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    I think you are so right Tanveer. There is THE way we are “supposed” to do the cocoon thing. And like most other things, when we buy into these common ideas, we are opting for average and mediocre. I also love, love, love your description of the cocoon as support – just beautiful. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    I think you are so right Tanveer. There is THE way we are “supposed” to do the cocoon thing. And like most other things, when we buy into these common ideas, we are opting for average and mediocre. I also love, love, love your description of the cocoon as support – just beautiful. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Beth – and I'm gald to know I'm in such good company. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Beth – and I'm gald to know I'm in such good company. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Beth – and I'm gald to know I'm in such good company. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Mickey. πŸ™‚ Aren't metaphors – good metaphors anyway – awesome?! And I've heard a very similar lecture about natural forest fires – they are part of a vital cycle. Somehow I was missing when God was giving out patience. Nothing like a few trips through the Goo Phase, to teach me how to wait!

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Mickey. πŸ™‚ Aren't metaphors – good metaphors anyway – awesome?! And I've heard a very similar lecture about natural forest fires – they are part of a vital cycle. Somehow I was missing when God was giving out patience. Nothing like a few trips through the Goo Phase, to teach me how to wait!

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Mickey. πŸ™‚ Aren't metaphors – good metaphors anyway – awesome?! And I've heard a very similar lecture about natural forest fires – they are part of a vital cycle. Somehow I was missing when God was giving out patience. Nothing like a few trips through the Goo Phase, to teach me how to wait!

  • Thank you Sarah for sharing this metaphor.I can honestly say I feel like I'm in the 'goo' stage… still trying to learn and find my path, or my new DNA as an entrepreneur…With you post here w/ point #5 and what you said earlier on twitter – “Can I just say that NOTHING beats the relationship power of Twitter. Absolutely NOTHING!!” I sure feel better about my journey from going from goo to butterfly πŸ™‚

  • Thank you Sarah for sharing this metaphor.

    I can honestly say I feel like I'm in the 'goo' stage… still trying to learn and find my path, or my new DNA as an entrepreneur…

    With you post here w/ point #5 and what you said earlier on twitter – “Can I just say that NOTHING beats the relationship power of Twitter. Absolutely NOTHING!!” I sure feel better about my journey from going from goo to butterfly πŸ™‚

  • Thank you Sarah for sharing this metaphor.

    I can honestly say I feel like I'm in the 'goo' stage… still trying to learn and find my path, or my new DNA as an entrepreneur…

    With you post here w/ point #5 and what you said earlier on twitter – “Can I just say that NOTHING beats the relationship power of Twitter. Absolutely NOTHING!!” I sure feel better about my journey from going from goo to butterfly πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Patrick – you are so smart. πŸ™‚ I just love your vocabulary. I think the reason most people settle for the Status Quo is because a) it is comfortable and b) breaking out of it is too hard and too scary. But your are right. At the end of the day, there are only two choice: agree with the fear and let it control you or feel it and bust out anyway.

  • sarahrobinson

    Patrick – you are so smart. πŸ™‚ I just love your vocabulary. I think the reason most people settle for the Status Quo is because a) it is comfortable and b) breaking out of it is too hard and too scary. But your are right. At the end of the day, there are only two choice: agree with the fear and let it control you or feel it and bust out anyway.

  • sarahrobinson

    Patrick – you are so smart. πŸ™‚ I just love your vocabulary. I think the reason most people settle for the Status Quo is because a) it is comfortable and b) breaking out of it is too hard and too scary. But your are right. At the end of the day, there are only two choice: agree with the fear and let it control you or feel it and bust out anyway.

  • christinecox

    Excellent! Thanks – next time I'm feeling 'gooey' I'll know it's a good, positive thing!

  • christinecox

    Excellent! Thanks – next time I'm feeling 'gooey' I'll know it's a good, positive thing!

  • christinecox

    Excellent! Thanks – next time I'm feeling 'gooey' I'll know it's a good, positive thing!

  • I think many of us are taught to look at our childhood as being the “goo” stage of our lifespan and as adults, we’re expected to be the butterfly that emerges from the cocoon of childhood. We also tend to look at that cocoon as being a shelter from the realities of the world.

    Perhaps we should realize that we never really become the butterfly, especially if we’re continuing to try and improve ourselves. And as for that cocoon, it’s not a shelter from the world, but the support we need to help us while we work on improving ourselves. From that vantage point, being goo isn’t so bad after all since it means we’re working on improving ourselves, of moving ourselves one step closer to becoming a butterfly.

    • Anonymous

      I think you are so right Tanveer. There is THE way we are “supposed” to do the cocoon thing. And like most other things, when we buy into these common ideas, we are opting for average and mediocre. I also love, love, love your description of the cocoon as support – just beautiful. πŸ™‚

  • Anonymous

    That is an excellent metaphor! I believe I’ve been goo once or twice.. πŸ˜‰

    • Anonymous

      Thank you Beth – and I’m gald to know I’m in such good company. πŸ™‚

  • Sarah, you always seem to frame your messages in such an accessible way – thank you for that. I love the caterpillar/butterfly image (I must admit, I didn’t know about the goo stage, but it makes sense now that I stop to consider it).

    I also liked Kimberly’s forest fire metaphor. It made me remember a speaker I saw in college. He visited from Siskiyou National Forest in Oregon. He said that going in and cleaning up after a forest fire (in natural lands, of course) is, “like mugging a burn victim.” That phrase always stayed with me, and in light of your post it resounds even more.

    People change at their own rate, and trying to make it “hurry up and happen already” would be like going in and cleaning up the leftover yet vital debris that the forest needs to grow back even stronger (or, as you say, like pulling open the cocoon before the butterfly is ready to fly). Patience, both in the one changing and in their supporters, makes all the difference. Thanks again for another great and thought-provoking post!

    • Anonymous

      Thank you Mickey. πŸ™‚ Aren’t metaphors – good metaphors anyway – awesome?! And I’ve heard a very similar lecture about natural forest fires – they are part of a vital cycle. Somehow I was missing when God was giving out patience. Nothing like a few trips through the Goo Phase, to teach me how to wait!

  • Sarah, I love this post. You have a simple, yet elegant way with words. This metaphor applies to so many people, esp leaders. In sharing your journey from The Grid to The Great Big World, you have engaged our hearts. We want to know more about the goo, not because it affects you alone, but because we are family, and it affects us, too. We live in a vast world where change is inevitable. As you so eloquently portrayed (OK, maybe it’s a bit difficult to discuss goo eloquently), change is the catalyst that makes it possible for butterflies to exist and for us to emerge from mediocrity. You have done an awesome job of placing us in the cocoon with you and all of that goo. I, for one, am delighted! Leaders belong in the goo if they are to emerge with the heart of a servant. Only in the goo can a leader stare down his/her weaknesses and uncover the messy stuff (a thirst for authority, power, and influence, among others) that gets in the way of lifting others. Typically, leaders want to be relevant; they want folks to know who they are. Such are the hungry little caterpillars, munching on the grass or, perhaps, sitting in the sunshine so others can admire their many legs or fuzzy little bodies. The difference, however, between the people kind of caterpillar and the real thing is the real caterpillar instinctively knows what lies in store beyond mediocrity; it leans into the transformation process with zeal and gusto. Such is the servant leader. They understand the significance of transformation. They likely have been through the goo, the long stretch between mediocrity and mastery, many times. Going in as a caterpillar, with all of their fuzz and faults, is not so difficult; overcoming mediocrity is a different story altogether. It requires a drastic transformation of the heart, a recognition it is best to lead from behind and beneath if the leader is to lift those who follow them high enough to reach their dreams. No more me, me, me. Instead, the servant leader must decrease while those they serve increase. Paul illustrates this trait for us in his letter to the Philippians when he tells us Jesus β€œmade himself a man of no reputation, taking on the very nature of a servant” (Phil 2:7). Yet, as a man of no reputation, people took notice. They also notice the servant leaders … not because of who they are but because of what they do. They are the butterflies, busy flitting from flower to flower, so to speak, making others relevant and helping their dreams come true. Emerging from the goo and escaping the cocoon as a butterfly is nothing short of a miracle. Escaping mediocrity by re-arranging our DNA is an equally delightful sight to behold! We anxiously await the moment of celebration when you spread your glorious wings, Sarah, and experience the Joy of flying on the wind across the many wonderful gardenscapes of The Great Big World! Thank you very much for sharing this marvelous post!

  • Sarah, I love this post. You have a simple, yet elegant way with words. This metaphor applies to so many people, esp leaders. In sharing your journey from The Grid to The Great Big World, you have engaged our hearts. We want to know more about the goo, not because it affects you alone, but because we are family, and it affects us, too.

    We live in a vast world where change is inevitable. As you so eloquently portrayed (OK, maybe it’s a bit difficult to discuss goo eloquently), change is the catalyst that makes it possible for butterflies to exist and for us to emerge from mediocrity. You have done an awesome job of placing us in the cocoon with you and all of that goo. I, for one, am delighted! Leaders belong in the goo if they are to emerge with the heart of a servant. Only in the goo can a leader stare down his/her weaknesses and uncover the messy stuff (a thirst for authority, power, and influence, among others) that gets in the way of lifting others. Typically, leaders want to be relevant; they want folks to know who they are.

    Such are the hungry little caterpillars, munching on the grass or, perhaps, sitting in the sunshine so others can admire their many legs or fuzzy little bodies. The difference, however, between the people kind of caterpillar and the real thing is the real caterpillar instinctively knows what lies in store beyond mediocrity; it leans into the transformation process with zeal and gusto.

    Such is the servant leader. They understand the significance of transformation. They likely have been through the goo, the long stretch between mediocrity and mastery, many times. Going in as a caterpillar, with all of their fuzz and faults, is not so difficult; overcoming mediocrity is a different story altogether. It requires a drastic transformation of the heart, a recognition it is best to lead from behind and beneath if the leader is to lift those who follow them high enough to reach their dreams. No more me, me, me. Instead, the servant leader must decrease while those they serve increase. Paul illustrates this trait for us in his letter to the Philippians when he tells us Jesus β€œmade himself a man of no reputation, taking on the very nature of a servant” (Phil 2:7). Yet, as a man of no reputation, people took notice. They also notice the servant leaders … not because of who they are but because of what they do. They are the butterflies, busy flitting from flower to flower, so to speak, making others relevant and helping their dreams come true.

    Emerging from the goo and escaping the cocoon as a butterfly is nothing short of a miracle. Escaping mediocrity by re-arranging our DNA is an equally delightful sight to behold! We anxiously await the moment of celebration when you spread your glorious wings, Sarah, and experience the Joy of flying on the wind across the many wonderful gardenscapes of The Great Big World! Thank you very much for sharing this marvelous post!

  • Sarah, I love this post. You have a simple, yet elegant way with words. This metaphor applies to so many people, esp leaders. In sharing your journey from The Grid to The Great Big World, you have engaged our hearts. We want to know more about the goo, not because it affects you alone, but because we are family, and it affects us, too.

    We live in a vast world where change is inevitable. As you so eloquently portrayed (OK, maybe it’s a bit difficult to discuss goo eloquently), change is the catalyst that makes it possible for butterflies to exist and for us to emerge from mediocrity. You have done an awesome job of placing us in the cocoon with you and all of that goo. I, for one, am delighted! Leaders belong in the goo if they are to emerge with the heart of a servant. Only in the goo can a leader stare down his/her weaknesses and uncover the messy stuff (a thirst for authority, power, and influence, among others) that gets in the way of lifting others. Typically, leaders want to be relevant; they want folks to know who they are.

    Such are the hungry little caterpillars, munching on the grass or, perhaps, sitting in the sunshine so others can admire their many legs or fuzzy little bodies. The difference, however, between the people kind of caterpillar and the real thing is the real caterpillar instinctively knows what lies in store beyond mediocrity; it leans into the transformation process with zeal and gusto.

    Such is the servant leader. They understand the significance of transformation. They likely have been through the goo, the long stretch between mediocrity and mastery, many times. Going in as a caterpillar, with all of their fuzz and faults, is not so difficult; overcoming mediocrity is a different story altogether. It requires a drastic transformation of the heart, a recognition it is best to lead from behind and beneath if the leader is to lift those who follow them high enough to reach their dreams. No more me, me, me. Instead, the servant leader must decrease while those they serve increase. Paul illustrates this trait for us in his letter to the Philippians when he tells us Jesus β€œmade himself a man of no reputation, taking on the very nature of a servant” (Phil 2:7). Yet, as a man of no reputation, people took notice. They also notice the servant leaders … not because of who they are but because of what they do. They are the butterflies, busy flitting from flower to flower, so to speak, making others relevant and helping their dreams come true.

    Emerging from the goo and escaping the cocoon as a butterfly is nothing short of a miracle. Escaping mediocrity by re-arranging our DNA is an equally delightful sight to behold! We anxiously await the moment of celebration when you spread your glorious wings, Sarah, and experience the Joy of flying on the wind across the many wonderful gardenscapes of The Great Big World! Thank you very much for sharing this marvelous post!

  • Brilliant metaphor! Thank you Sarah, for articulating so well how I'm feeling ; )

  • Brilliant metaphor! Thank you Sarah, for articulating so well how I'm feeling ; )

  • Brilliant metaphor! Thank you Sarah, for articulating so well how I'm feeling ; )

  • Relaxing through the Goo phase is important. Because re-arranging DNA is hard. But it's an important phase and an important metaphor.

  • Relaxing through the Goo phase is important. Because re-arranging DNA is hard. But it's an important phase and an important metaphor.

  • Relaxing through the Goo phase is important. Because re-arranging DNA is hard. But it's an important phase and an important metaphor.

  • I think a real challenge, as you get older (I’m of course talking about other people, not me!), is that one increasingly rationalizes the idea that there no longer is a need for reinventing onesself, especially in the face of the fact that the DNA seems to be permanently wired. The truth in this is that the fear of re-arranging the DNA is so gargantuan that it becomes a virtual obstacle to us proactively participating in that reinvention. FDR said, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself”, and that governs our reticence to accept that change is inevitable, so you either fear it and are a passenger or you act and become the driver.

    Thanks for the post, SR. As always, right on target.

    • Anonymous

      Patrick – you are so smart. πŸ™‚ I just love your vocabulary. I think the reason most people settle for the Status Quo is because a) it is comfortable and b) breaking out of it is too hard and too scary. But your are right. At the end of the day, there are only two choice: agree with the fear and let it control you or feel it and bust out anyway.

  • Thank you Sarah for sharing this metaphor.

    I can honestly say I feel like I’m in the ‘goo’ stage… still trying to learn and find my path, or my new DNA as an entrepreneur…

    With you post here w/ point #5 and what you said earlier on twitter – “Can I just say that NOTHING beats the relationship power of Twitter. Absolutely NOTHING!!” I sure feel better about my journey from going from goo to butterfly πŸ™‚

  • Anonymous

    Excellent! Thanks – next time I’m feeling ‘gooey’ I’ll know it’s a good, positive thing!

  • sarahrobinson

    You leave me speechless – as always. You take my very simple little idea and transform into something shiny and amazing. And I love your tie-in to Jesus and servant leaders. And you are so right – butterflies and escaping mediocrity are nothing short of miraculous. As are you. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    You leave me speechless – as always. You take my very simple little idea and transform into something shiny and amazing. And I love your tie-in to Jesus and servant leaders. And you are so right – butterflies and escaping mediocrity are nothing short of miraculous. As are you. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    You leave me speechless – as always. You take my very simple little idea and transform into something shiny and amazing. And I love your tie-in to Jesus and servant leaders. And you are so right – butterflies and escaping mediocrity are nothing short of miraculous. As are you. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Patrick. Yeah…when you feel like goo and your hear the word “goo” it totally resonates as spot-on, doesn't it?!

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Patrick. Yeah…when you feel like goo and your hear the word “goo” it totally resonates as spot-on, doesn't it?!

  • sarahrobinson

    Thank you Patrick. Yeah…when you feel like goo and your hear the word “goo” it totally resonates as spot-on, doesn't it?!

  • sarahrobinson

    I so agree Bridget. Actually, I think if we fight the Goo Phase, it lasts even longer. Relaxing into it let's it do it's thing. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    I so agree Bridget. Actually, I think if we fight the Goo Phase, it lasts even longer. Relaxing into it let's it do it's thing. πŸ™‚

  • sarahrobinson

    I so agree Bridget. Actually, I think if we fight the Goo Phase, it lasts even longer. Relaxing into it let's it do it's thing. πŸ™‚

    • testing the reply….

  • Sarah, I love this post. You have a simple, yet elegant way with words. This metaphor applies to so many people, esp leaders. In sharing your journey from The Grid to The Great Big World, you have engaged our hearts. We want to know more about the goo, not because it affects you alone, but because we are family, and it affects us, too.

    We live in a vast world where change is inevitable. As you so eloquently portrayed (OK, maybe it’s a bit difficult to discuss goo eloquently), change is the catalyst that makes it possible for butterflies to exist and for us to emerge from mediocrity. You have done an awesome job of placing us in the cocoon with you and all of that goo. I, for one, am delighted! Leaders belong in the goo if they are to emerge with the heart of a servant. Only in the goo can a leader stare down his/her weaknesses and uncover the messy stuff (a thirst for authority, power, and influence, among others) that gets in the way of lifting others. Typically, leaders want to be relevant; they want folks to know who they are.

    Such are the hungry little caterpillars, munching on the grass or, perhaps, sitting in the sunshine so others can admire their many legs or fuzzy little bodies. The difference, however, between the people kind of caterpillar and the real thing is the real caterpillar instinctively knows what lies in store beyond mediocrity; it leans into the transformation process with zeal and gusto.

    Such is the servant leader. They understand the significance of transformation. They likely have been through the goo, the long stretch between mediocrity and mastery, many times. Going in as a caterpillar, with all of their fuzz and faults, is not so difficult; overcoming mediocrity is a different story altogether. It requires a drastic transformation of the heart, a recognition it is best to lead from behind and beneath if the leader is to lift those who follow them high enough to reach their dreams. No more me, me, me. Instead, the servant leader must decrease while those they serve increase. Paul illustrates this trait for us in his letter to the Philippians when he tells us Jesus β€œmade himself a man of no reputation, taking on the very nature of a servant” (Phil 2:7). Yet, as a man of no reputation, people took notice. They also notice the servant leaders … not because of who they are but because of what they do. They are the butterflies, busy flitting from flower to flower, so to speak, making others relevant and helping their dreams come true.

    Emerging from the goo and escaping the cocoon as a butterfly is nothing short of a miracle. Escaping mediocrity by re-arranging our DNA is an equally delightful sight to behold! We anxiously await the moment of celebration when you spread your glorious wings, Sarah, and experience the Joy of flying on the wind across the many wonderful gardenscapes of The Great Big World! Thank you very much for sharing this marvelous post!

    • Anonymous

      You leave me speechless – as always. You take my very simple little idea and transform into something shiny and amazing. And I love your tie-in to Jesus and servant leaders. And you are so right – butterflies and escaping mediocrity are nothing short of miraculous. As are you. πŸ™‚

  • Brilliant metaphor! Thank you Sarah, for articulating so well how I’m feeling ; )

    • Anonymous

      Thank you Patrick. Yeah…when you feel like goo and your hear the word “goo” it totally resonates as spot-on, doesn’t it?!

  • Relaxing through the Goo phase is important. Because re-arranging DNA is hard. But it’s an important phase and an important metaphor.

    • Anonymous

      I so agree Bridget. Actually, I think if we fight the Goo Phase, it lasts even longer. Relaxing into it let’s it do it’s thing. πŸ™‚

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  • henie

    Sarah!Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

  • henie

    Sarah!

    Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

  • henie

    Sarah!

    Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

    • Anonymous

      test comment #giannii

    • Anonymous

      testin….

  • henie

    Sarah!

    Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

  • Anonymous

    Sarah!

    Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

  • testing the reply….

  • testing the reply….

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  • sarahrobinson

    test comment #giannii

  • sarahrobinson

    test comment #giannii

  • sarahrobinson

    testin….

  • sarahrobinson

    testin….

  • henie

    Sarah!

    Oh, this is awesome! There is no *gooD* without the *goo* first! Thank you! :~) Funny, another thought just came to me…I always say DNA means *Do Not Alter*…you & butterfly proved me wrong!

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  • Jim

    I must be in my Goo phase. I am not doing too well. I pray that things get better.
    Thanks for the explanation.

  • Jim

    I must be in my Goo phase. I am not doing too well. I pray that things get better.
    Thanks for the explanation.